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AMAZONITE

Amazonite

One of the main things about Amazonite is that its appearance elucidates calm confidence. Also known as the Amazon stone, this is a tectosilicate mineral that belongs to the potassium-rich feldspar mineral group called the microcline. Its bluish green color is captivating to the eye and will most likely attract you to this rare gemstone. Since ancient times, Amazonite has been admired throughout the world, an admiration that continues today.

Features of the Amazonite

Although the Amazonite has various tones of green and blue that are closely associated with the Amazon River, it can also range from deep blue to turquoise. This gemstone also varies in brilliance depending on whether it has white threads or black spots on it. Again, its color may depend on where it comes from. This gemstone is also known by names such as green amethyst or yellow emerald but is commonly known as Amazonite.

Is Amazonite a Good Stone?

Besides its grandiose features, Amazonite has a very long history dating back to the tenth century. Its green and bluish-green colors are believed to offer a gentle but energetic flow that's almost akin to the dense green riverbanks of the Amazon rainforest.

If you like the color of this gorgeous stone, you can go for Amazonite crystal bracelets, Amazonite necklaces, tumbled Amazonite, and natural Amazonite Cabochon loose gemstones. You can also use polished Amazonite stones for decoration purposes.

Historically, the Amazonite was a highly-treasured mineral that was used by ancient Egyptians to make gorgeous ornamental pieces and jewelry. In addition to its use for jewelry purposes, many people around the world believe that this relatively rare stone can be used for certain healing practices.

Where is Amazonite Found?

Although Amazonite is found in many areas across the world, some of the finest Amazonites are found in Brazil, Peru, and Ethiopia. In the United States, it's majorly found in Pike's Peak, Colorado and Amelia Courthouse, Virginia. It's also found in other countries such as China, Madagascar, Russia, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Mozambique.

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